Belkin 55-Piece Computer Tool Kit with Black Case

December 24, 2016 - Comment

Belkin F8E062 55-Piece Computer Tool Kit with Black Case (Demagnetized Tools) Product Features 55-piece set of demagnetized tools for computer repair. Provides a custom-designed case. The perfect tools for do-it-yourself enthusiasts. Includes a comprehensive set of tools for repairing and upgrading electronic devices. Comes with Belkin’s lifetime warranty.

Buy Now! $55.99Amazon.com Price
(as of November 23, 2017 5:55 am UTC - Details)

Belkin F8E062 55-Piece Computer Tool Kit with Black Case (Demagnetized Tools)

Product Features

  • 55-piece set of demagnetized tools for computer repair.
  • Provides a custom-designed case.
  • The perfect tools for do-it-yourself enthusiasts.
  • Includes a comprehensive set of tools for repairing and upgrading electronic devices.
  • Comes with Belkin’s lifetime warranty.

Arthur M.C says:

Really good. I bought this to fix a Dell XPS laptop whose hard-drive had been having problems. Essentially I had to replace the hard-drive, and I needed a tool kit to pry open this laptop. This tool kit had everything I needed, from tweezers to pick up small screws that had fallen into those small holes, to a small screw driver needed to screw them in. I couldn’t have asked for anything better (or less?). 

Amazon Customer says:

Fantastic for PC repair A lot of these kits are over burdened with tools that you will honestly never need. I’ve found this to be perfect not just for fixing PCs but also for fixing up electronics in general. The Soldering Iron is cheap and without a case. 

Crash and Burn says:

Keeps essential tools handy and organized It mostly duplicates other tools I have around the house and garage, but having them all together, and handy makes a big difference. I just finished an embedded programming project where I was interfacing a micro-controller with a motion detector, light dependent resistor, pushbutton, and 7 segment LED display. The needle nose pliers were just the right size for pushing, pulling, and bending pins so they would make positive, continuous contact with the through hole on the microcomputer PC…

Write a comment